Comfort Food · Curry · Indian · Konkani · Main Course · Mangalorean · Rice · South Indian · Vegetarian

Muga Ghashi/ Sprouted Mung bean in a tangy coconut curry- Konkani Style


In one of my earlier posts I have mentioned that the basic ingredients for most of the konkani curry’s remain the same, just that the kind of tempering and the vegetable used changes the flavour pretty drastically. Coconut lovers will love these curry’s. So this curry also like most Konkani dishes involves the process of making a paste out of coconut, oil roasted dried red chilli’s & tamarind. The tamarind adds the tanginess to this curry.

The tempering used here is mustard seeds with some curry leaves. Traditionally coconut oil is used for the tempering. But then since there is already a lot of coconut flavour to this curry you can use any other cooking oil for your tempering.

Muga Ghashi/ Sprouted Mung bean in a tangy coconut curry- Konkani Style

The traditional method of preparing this dish involves fresh grated coconut, oil roasted dried red chilli’s and some tamarind all ground together into a coarse/smooth paste. But when you are in a hurry you could use coconut milk as a substitute for the grated coconut and red chilli powder for the dried red chilli’s & some tamarind juice. But of course nothing to beat the curry made using fresh ground paste. For the advantage of all I will describe both the methods below.

Traditionally Brahmins are supposed to be pure vegetarians. They are not supposed to eat onions/garlic since they are considered to be natural aphrodisiacs. Well the brahmins who are still in the profession of being priests follow this, but the rest have now started eating onions and garlic. But during festivals onion & garlic is not used in the food which is cooked in any brahmin household. So this is one of the curry’s prepared during festivals/puja’s in a konkani household as it does not require onion or garlic in it.

Traditional Method:
Ingredients: (Serves 4) Preparation Time: 20 mins
Spouted mung bean – around 300 gms
Potato – 2 medium-sized, peeled & chopped into small cubes the size of salad crouton
Coconut – freshly grated, around 2 cups/ close 1.5 medium-sized coconuts grated
Dried Red chilli’s – 6-7 medium spicy variety, If required you could add some chilli powder later on
Tamarind – 1 marble sized ball, throw away any seeds if present in the tamarind
Mustard seeds – 1 tsp
Curry leaves – 1 sprig or about 6-8 leaves
Cooking oil – 1 tbsp
Salt to taste

Method:
Heat about a litre of water in a pressure cooker set to medium heat. Once the water comes to a boil add the chopped potatoes along with the sprouted mung beans.

Tip: Instead of potatoes you may also use some Raw banana/plantain or even some sliced bamboo shoots. Thanks to my friend Narmada for reminding me about this, I had almost completely forgotten these options. Sadly I had a can of bamboo shoots with me, which I could have swapped for the potatoes. 😦 Bamboo shoots adds its own flavour to this dish.

Narmada says she also swaps the potatoes with some baby corn, I will try this the next time I prepare this dish. My mum swaps the potatoes with yam too, even this combination is really tasty.

Sprouted Mung bean

Add some salt to taste. Close the pressure cook and cook for a whistle. The mung bean will dissolve away if you cook it for more than a whistle.

In the meanwhile heat about 1 tsp of oil in a tempering vessel or a fry pan and set the heat to medium. Now fry the dried red chilli in the oil till it loses it bright red colour and turns into a light shade of brown or deep red. Do not let them turn black or dark brown. Take them off heat and cool them. Once it has cooled to room temperature add them along with the tamarind, grated coconut to a mixer jar and grind it to a smooth paste. You may need to add a little water (1-2 tbsp) to turn it into a smooth paste.

When the pressure is off the cooker, open it. Most of the green skin of the mung bean will be floating on the top. Take it off & throw it away. Now set the heat to medium and place the pressure cooker back on the stove. When the water begins to boil add the prepared coconut paste & mix well. Let the curry begin to boil, then lower the heat & let the curry bubble for a good 5 minutes so as the raw flavour of the coconut & tamarind go away. Check salt & adjust.

Tips:1. If the dried chilli’s you used did not make the dish as hot as you desired then add some red chilli powder & adjust accordingly.
2. If you want some nice colour to the dish you can throw in a few dried red chilli’s which add colour along with the ones added for spice. Or add some Kashmiri red chilli powder which adds colour later on.
3. If the red chilli’s you used ended up making the dish too hot then all you can do to reduce it is to add some extra coconut milk n increase the quantity of the curry. But this may require addition of some extra tamarind water, since your ending up making more curry.
4. If the curry is too thick add a little water to achieve the consistency you desire.

Now prepare the tempering. Heat rest of the oil in a frying pan set to medium heat and let the mustard seeds splutter.

Mustard seeds & curry leaves tempering

Turn off the heat & add the curry leaves, now add this tempering to the bubbling curry & turn off the heat.

After adding the tempering to the curry..

Serving suggestions:
The best accompaniment for this dish is a bowl of hot steamed rice. But you may also eat them with some hot chapati’s.

Quick method:
Ingredients: (Serves 4) Preparation Time: 20 mins
Potato – 2 medium-sized, peeled & chopped into small cubes the size of salad crouton
Coconut milk – about 300 ml, thick not watery
Spouted mung bean – around 300 gms
Desiccated coconut – 1 cup about 100gms
Red chilli powder – as desired, depends on the type of red chilli powder used
Tamarind – 1 marble sized ball, don’t add seeds, soak this tamarind in about 100 ml warm water for at least 5 minutes
Mustard seeds – 1 tsp
Curry leaves – 1 sprig or about 6-8 leaves
Cooking oil – 1 tbsp
Salt to taste

Method:
Now heat about 400ml of water in a pot set to medium heat. Once the water comes to a boil add the chopped potatoes along with the sprouted mung bean.Add some salt to taste. Close the pressure cook and cook for a whistle. The mung bean will dissolve away if you cook it for more than a whistle.

Squeeze & separate the juice from the tamarind and keep aside the tamarind juice.

Note: The curry prepared in this manner does not have the thick consistency that you achieve from using fresh grated coconut paste.

When the pressure is off the cooker, open it. Most of the green skin of the mung bean will be floating on the top. Take it off & throw it away.

Remove the green skin of the mung bean floating around..

Now set the heat to medium and place the pressure cooker back on the stove. Add the coconut milk & chilli powder & let the curry come to a boil. When the curry bubbles add the tamarind juice to it. If you add tamarind before the curry bubbles then the time taken for the curry to come to a boil increases. Check salt & adjust. Lower heat if required.Let the curry bubble for a good 5 minutes so as the raw flavour of the coconut & tamarind go away.

Now prepare the tempering. Heat rest of the oil in a frying pan set to medium heat and let the mustard seeds splutter.
If you want a twist to the muga ghashi add some finely chopped onions too.. Fry till they turn golden brown. The original recipe does not require you to add onions, I add it sometimes just for a change..

Turn off the heat & add the curry leaves, now add this tempering to the bubbling curry & turn off the heat.

Serving suggestions:
The best accompaniment for this dish is a bowl of hot steamed rice. But you may also eat them with some hot chapati’s.

Muga gashi..

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9 thoughts on “Muga Ghashi/ Sprouted Mung bean in a tangy coconut curry- Konkani Style

  1. Hi,
    Thanks a lot for the details. I am alone on business trip at US and this helped me to prepare a homely dish on the week-end and come-out of home-sickness up-to an extent.
    BTW, in “Quick method” section, you mentioned “Onion – 1 large, finely chopped” as ingredient; but no-where it’s been used in further details… As you mentioned in the beginning, hope this dish shouldn’t need onion and garlic… It confuses the guy like me, who cooks rarely and strictly follow each and every line of internet-based recipes,

    Any way, thanks again for the excellent recipe..

    Regards,
    Yogeesh Kamath

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    1. I’m happy that my blog helped you prepare a meal which helped when you were homesick..

      The onions are used for the tempering.. Sorry if missed mentioning it.. I will rectify the recipe..

      Like

  2. Thanks for referring this recipe, Anitha.
    I have never tried Konkani cuisine but have always wanted to. I love coconut based curries. Baby corn and bamboo shoot option sounded fun.. Moong in coconut is very fascinating for me..I love sprouts :). Bookmarking it 🙂

    Like

    1. Hey.. No problem..glad that you liked the recipe… I suggested these recipes to you because you said you loved the curry base for the fish curry I had posted .. N most Konkani currys are made with this base..moreover I posted these recipes long back.. And I knew you would not have seen them.. 🙂

      Like

  3. This looks like delicious comfort food, lots of new ingredients that I have yet to experiment with particularly coconut milk but from your stunning pictures I feel I can taste the curry!

    Like

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